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Bravo Governor Rick Scott of Florida.  Little do his detractors know it, but he is doing them a favor by pointing out the obvious.

Governor Scott is finally bringing to the public table the 'unmentionable' realities that plague our colleges and universities.  Among these, Gov. Scott has questioned the value of liberal arts degrees, dissed anthropologists, proposed ending tenure for professors and posted salaries of all state university employees on the Internet.

Of course the academics are insulted by this.  How dare he question their value?  Their worth is unmeasurable.  I mean let's be honest here.  Academia and the government are the last bastions of hope for those who are so talented and creative that if not for these institutions, they would be forced to have to work their way up the ladder at The Golden Arches…

In other words their real value is to only to themselves and a few of their students who aspire to join this high paying class of self important 'intellectuals'. 

The argument is that 'higher education should be about pursuit of knowledge, not the almighty dollar'.  Well I'm sorry to disturb them in the land of Oz but the whole purpose of education and the pursuit of knowledge is to advance the individual and society.   And the reality is, like it or not, that without 'almighty dollar' this advance comes to a screeching halt.

Is Gov. Scott at war with academia?

Laying the groundwork to revamp higher education in Florida, Gov. Rick Scott has questioned the value of liberal arts degrees, dissed anthropologists, proposed ending tenure for professors and posted salaries of all state university employees on the Internet.

Scott also recently sent a letter to state university trustee boards pushing for change on campuses. He included excerpts from a Wall Street Journal op-ed piece by Ohio University economics professor Richard Vedder, "Time to Make Professors Teach." Vedder derided much academic research as "obscure" and "trivial," noting there have been 21,000 scholarly articles on Shakespeare since 1980.

"Wouldn't 5,000 have been enough?" Vedder wrote.  …

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