He's widely credited with pioneering the color TV that we're familiar with today (and holding a related patent — number 2920132 — granted in December of 1953), while also publishing initial technical papers on transistor radios. As if that weren't enough, he was also instrumental in the progress of GPS, spearheading the development of key elements in the latter portion of his career.

Arthur P. Stern, instrumental in inventing the color television and GPS, passes away

By Darren Murphy posted June 8, 2012

Engadget learned that Arthur P. Stern passed away on May 24th, 2012, but just this week, The Los Angeles Times has published a laudable look back at a man that had an enormous impact on the technology that we rely on — and, quite frankly, take for granted — each and every day. Born in 1925 in Budapest, Hungary, Arthur went on to obtain an M.E.E. from Syracuse University, joining General Electric in 1951 and making a near-immediate impact in the realm of television. He's widely credited with pioneering the color TV that we're familiar with today (and holding a related patent — number 2920132 — granted in December of 1953), while also publishing initial technical papers on transistor radios. As if that weren't enough, he was also instrumental in the progress of GPS, spearheading the development of key elements in the latter portion of his career.

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When color TV was introduced in the U.S.A. in 1954 by RCA (with their CT-100), people were very skeptical. There were only a few hours of color programs broadcast weekly, the early picture tubes were only 15" and were too small to enjoy viewing, plus the sets were very expensive (originally more than $1,000 which is appr. 12,000 EUR today). Too expensive for the general public, and RCA lost money on every set sold in these days. But business must go on, so RCA decided to develop a cheaper set with a 21 inch screen. This was the "Aldrich" model, a simply designed set. The Aldrich was offered in fall of 1956 and was the first American color TV with a price of under $500. The set was advertised as so simple that "even a child can tune it" to counter the impression that color TV is much more complicated in adjusting a B&W TV (which of course it was). In another ad they claimed it was "Two sets in one" referring to B&W compatible color system created first by RCA.  – Early Color Television

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